Bone Appetite

ernie lgOn Thursday, April 10th, the Scottsdale Gallery Association is dedicating its first ever Scottsdale Art Walk to our four-legged friends. Bonner David Galleries has long been in support of our furry family members and is excited to join in the celebration of dogs. That night, we will be featuring the distinctive work of Ron Burns, who has become famous for depicting ‘furever best friends’ of all kinds. From search and rescue dogs and shelter dogs, to portraits of loved pets, past and present, he has a keen eye for capturing the souls of our favorite animals.

During the night, we will also have donations from Bentley’s Biscuts, who create healthy and tasty treats that dogs simply love. Join us from 7:00 – 9:00 pm of April 10th, for a night dedicated to our pets who hold a special place in our hearts.

Ron Burns “Dogipedia”

Painter Ron Burns has become known for his colorful portraits of man’s best friend and his uncanny ability to capture an animal’s unique soul and personality on canvas. His much loved portraits can be seen in both public and private collections around the world.

Ryder_hires

This year Ron Burns is continuing his work with the Arizona Humane Society with a portrait of Ryder, a two year-old rescued pit bull. Ryder was found by cops severely starved and hanging from a door handle, with scars on her face from years of abuse. Unable to even stand when she first arrived to the Humane Society, she was carefully nurtured back to health by loving caretakers. Now returning to health, everyone is hopeful that Ryder will have a second chance to live a happy life with a loving family. Her portrait, which depicts her in the setting of her “furever home,” will be debuted during Ron Burns show opening on Thursday, December 5, 2013 from 6-9pm.

Also on that Thursday night, there will be a raffle held for a chance to win a limited edition holiday print. All proceeds from the raffle will be donated to the Arizona Humane Society to help them in their efforts to rescue more animals in need like Ryder.

The show will run from December 5th through the 16th. Make sure to mark your calendars so you don’t miss out!

 

DEARFRIENDSFLYER

Nocona Burgess Native Artwalk

Kicks IronThis Thursday, February 28th, on Main street is Scottsdale’s Native Artwalk. In celebration of the rich culture and long standing tradition of fine art among Native artsts, Bonner David Galleries will be featuring the work of Native artist, Nocona Burgess.

Burgess is a Comanche from Lawton Oklahoma, from a family consisting of several artists, which specialize in many forms of art. Considering his close relationship with art all throughout his life, he feels it was inevitable that he would one day become an artist himself, it is in his blood. 

Burgess uses his own personal, contemporary style to depict traditional subjects and old portraits. He feels the act of  painting these images and looking them over for hours at a time, allows him to connect with the subject matter and “is a way of saying thank you to them for all of their sacrifices.”

Burgess’ show will open on February 28th, during Native Artwalk from 6-9pm. Make sure to come down to the gallery to see the beautiful and unique work of Nocona Burgess.

Dyana Hesson “Up Close and Personal”

Blush Flower #1 24x48Dyana Hesson has been painting beautiful close-ups of flowers for years. However, this year, with her show “Up Close and Personal,” which opens on February 14th at 6pm, it’s a little more personal. With each sale, Hesson will donate a portion to Show Hope.

“Imagine you are standing at the edge of 50 acres of land looking at 10 million blooming flowers.  Rows of red, yellow, pink, fuchsia, coral, orange, gold, blush, and white racing out ahead of you like ribbons in the wind. At times, the intensity of the colors is so great it’s helpful to remove your gaze and fix it on the monotonous blue of the Pacific Ocean near by.  The prospect of experiencing something so vast is overwhelming. There is a desire to get up close and personal with each bloom, but that’s not possible. Walking away in not an option.  It’s time’s to dive in.  

“This was my Easter Morning at the Carlsbad Flower Fields in California in 2012.  I had seen the fields on TV and in photos, but nothing prepared me for the enormity and intensity of these fields.  Immediately I though of how I could paint a whole show on these flowers, but how?  One flower at a time.

“Now imagine you are standing in front of the 153 million orphans of the world.  Children who through no fault of their own are parent-less. Red, yellow, black and white, from all nations.  The enormity of the problem is overwhelming.  It would be easier to look away.

“How can you make a difference, how can you get up close and personal with each child?

“Walking away is not an option. Its time to dive in.  One child at a time.Flowers # 4931,4932  24x24

“Adoption is personal to me. Mine is a life that was forever changed when the Walker family took me home to be in their family.   I will always be eternally thankful for the sacrifice my biological parents made, and the commitment my parents made all those years ago.

“This year, I am honoring orphans with this show.  When you look at these blooms, think of the children of the world needing care or waiting for a home.   If you take a painting home with you, you may have the honor of naming it, whatever you’d like, and I will donate a portion of your sale to “Show Hope” that helps families with their adoption costs.

“One flower at a time.  One child at a time.  It’s personal.”

-Dyana Hesson

On Friday, February 15th, from 6-8pm, there will be a special preview night benefiting Show Hope- Bringing Hope to Orphans. During this event, there will be champagne, live music and raffle items. Tickets will be sold at the door for $20 with cash or check, or you can purchase advance tickets.

Her show will be hanging in the gallery until February 28th, so we hope to see you in the gallery, so you can see these beautiful works of art for yourself!

Please visit our website to see all of her new paintings, or view the PDF of her 2013 show brochure: UpCloseandPersonal

Michael Carson “Depth Perception”

Inspiration vs. Imitation
By Dr. Clark David Olson

Just where do artists draw their inspiration? Landscape artists typically spend much time in nature. Still life artists work with composition by collecting vases, flowers, tables, and fabrics. But figurative artists gather their inspiration from people—people everywhere. For Michael Carson, he admits “Anything I see, a hairstyle, whatever, I’m constantly gathering.” And just think of the variety of people one encounters during everyday life.
No doubt if you’ve visited major museums around the world, the Metropolitan in New York City, the Louvre or d’Orsay in Paris, or the Prado in Madrid you’ve seen talented artists in the galleries, working to recreate the works of the masters as they set up their easels and bring their palettes (and permits) to the museum to see if they can’t replicate these masterpieces. It’s commonly said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

But where should, and where can one draw the line between pure imitation and genuine inspiration? Artists typically surround themselves with the arts—fine architecture, music, fashion, theatre, and paintings and sculptures. Often these influences resonate within an artist and they are synthesized into their creative spirit, distilled, and then reflected in the unique art they create. As Carson notes, “artists only do themselves a disservice by not taking from other people’s art.”

Indeed, various artistic movements and schools have begun and benefitted by artists collaborating toward different styles. Kandinsky was the first known “Abstract Expressionist” followed a generation later by American Jackson Pollock, Max Ernst and Willem de Kooning. Color Field was inspired by Mark Rothko, and continued with such artists as Robert Motherwell, Barnett Newman, and Helen Frankenthaler.

Carson willing admits to being influenced in his figurative work by college roommates and artists Malcolm “Skip” Lipke and Milt Kobayashi, who obviously influenced each other. Both of them became successful artists and teachers, who passed down their style and techniques to countless students, some of whom have become successful in their own rite. Among artists, there is a culture of sharing, of borrowing, of finding inspiration in another artist’s work and putting your own unique spin on it. In Carson’s view, this give and take is what helps artist progress with their work, finding new and more personal ways of expressing their own artistic vision. Without it, he cautions, there is a risk of falling into an artistic rut. “People who I see who have their own completely original ideas—or say they do—I don’t see them evolving as fast as other artists.” And while being inspired by other artists, finding elements he wants to uniquely work into his own paintings while still retaining his own creative voice, seems, for Carson, quite intuitive. He says, “I can never be influenced enough…any new idea is an influence.” Carson believes that his growth as an artist hinges on his keeping an open eye and open mind to what his fellow artists are doing, using those influences to break new artistic ground.

Within the past two years, since he’s relocated from his native Minnesota to the Arizona desert, Michael notes that not only have his figurative subjects’ wardrobes changed, but he is aware of a shift in his color palette, using fewer colors to create a more sophisticated look. “I feel like I’ve evolved into a different artist,” he comments as he now works painting in layers to achieve of simpler, looser style. He admits to a complete evolution as an artist. His upcoming show evidences a new confidence, leaving old influences behind, as he makes little effort to hide brushstrokes, drips, or even the sketches he began with on the canvas.

It is Carson’s hope that audiences who experience his paintings will be keenly aware of themselves as viewers and question how that affects their relationship with the work as he takes figurative painting in a new direction. “I want to take the genre and do something new in that field. . . .I want to do something different with it. I will always keep in the back of my head that I want it to be a beautiful painting. . . but I also want to create something new for myself. It’s kind of a selfish thing that I do, actually.”

Sadly, some observers still make unfair comparisons of his work, as well as the work of other figurative artists. Carson believes that figurative art is a little unfairly targeted when it comes to critical discussions of imitation, “It’s kind of interesting how in the figurative painting world, it’s a little more obvious to pick [similarities] apart. I could walk into a gallery right now and see two or three landscape artists whose paintings look exactly alike, but no one ever talks about this with landscapes. There’s something about the figure that’s so recognizable. . . .I notice more of a conversation around artists imitating when it comes to figurative work.”

Despite such criticism, Carson proceeds boldly in his own, new directions. Acknowledging his skillset gained from his teachers and mentors, he now works to combine all the influences he exposes himself to toward painting in his own, bold and unique direction. Both skeptics and believers agree that Michael Carson’s paintings are original and truly inspired works of art.

Michael Carson’s show, “Depth Perception”, opens on Thursday, February 7th at 6pm until 9pm. His show will run in the gallery through February 26th. Visit our website to see all the new works for the show or view our show catalog at this link: MichaelCarson2013DepthPerception

Peregrine Heathcote: New Works

During this time of the year in Arizona, classic cars are everywhere. London-based painter, Peregrine Heathcote has a taste for the classic, which is easily visible when viewing any of his work. He combines the intoxicating glamour of iconic pre-war design with modern conceptions of beauty and silverscreen-era romance, seemingly crossing the boundaries of time. Through scenes of beautiful women and classic cars and planes, he depicts the world of our dreams. It may be a vision of the international, jet-set culture, the calming allure of the water, or timeless silverscreen romance.

His show opening, which will be from 6-9 pm on Thursday, January 10th features several new works which encompass the intrigue of a by-gone world with a flair of contemporary spirit. To view the complete show catalog PDF, click here: Heathcote 2013, or visit our website. The show will run through January 30th.

Quim Bove “Abstractions”

Abstract painter, Quim Bove seeks, though his work, to embody passion and emotion, in a way that almost delves into the realms of the subconscious, bringing them to life with each masterpiece. Born in Catalonia, Spain, he has been painting his entire life. His art flourished in Europe for many years. He was a window display director for Hermes in Southern France, Christian Dior in Barcelona and later Saks Fifth Avenue, until he eventually moved to Arizona, drawn by the inspirational powers and colors of the Sonoran desert.

Painting is Bove’s passion and pure, untainted portrayal of that passion, has become his art. His work is characterized with palettes of colors that jump from the canvas with fluid patterns of motion and explosions. “My artwork translates the relationship between humanity and the universe through a metaphoric representation of flashes of the human mind in different stages.” He paints with a rich blend of color and shine, eliciting feelings of comfort and warmth.

Bove’s most recent collection, entitled “Abstraction,” will continue this theme, taking his portfolio to new heights. Each unique, and skillfully composed painting, is sure to capture the imagination and hearts of everyone in the room. Come and spend the evening with us at Bonner David Galleries, on April 26th, for an opening reception the show and witness the phenomenal works of Quim Bove.

“Luminosity”

On Thursday, March 29, 2012, we were joined by painter, Gail Morris, for the opening of her show “Luminosity”. It was a night where both collector and those new to Morris’ work, could enjoy the magnificent beauty of her paintings, along with wine and chocolate. The works of Morris transcend the lines of contemporary and traditional, with landscapes that capture the raw essence of the scenery through their vivid hues and striking contrasts. This year’s show is no exception, with paintings that leave the viewer in awe of their simple grandeur. She paints each one in a way that “captures the resonant wonder of the land.”

Many of the scenes, portray the intriguing landscape of California, where Morris currently resides. However, she does not confine herself to the coasts or hillsides of one state, but seeks to “capture the soothing exubrance of the Western Landscape.” Come visit Bonner David Galleries and enter the world of Gail Morris, filled with light, color and breathtaking scenes.

Claudia Hartley and Dyana Hesson “Together Again”

Claudia Hartley and Dyana Hesson will be reuniting at Bonner David Galleries on February 2, 2012, in a role reversal of sorts.  Hartley, so well known for her colorful landscapes has used her move to the South to focus on creating cheerful interior scenes, while Hesson, mostly known for her botanical images, makes a foray into the world of landscape painting.

Claudia Hartley’s style has evolved over the years, leading to her newest works. During college, she experimented widely with abstracts. She later went through a time of painting portraits, using an impressionistic or realistic style, in oils. Yet, she missed strong, vibrant colors. Now, her love of Fauvist painters and their use of bright colors are very apparent, in her modernist paintings. She chooses to convey the love of her subject matter using exciting, bold colors in acrylics. When describing her own paintings, she says they are “happy, cheerful” and “intricate composition, [using a] large variety of colors and layers of patterns.” Hartley’s eye-catching creations of Southern interiors and stunning landscapes successfully convey her love for her surroundings, giving viewers the same chance to enjoy the world in which we live.

Dyana Hesson, known for her beautifully detailed flowers, will be showing her annual collection of conversation hearts, small paintings of roses named after the Valentine candy. Continuing with her love of nature and its beauty, she has recently begun painting landscapes, viewing nature from a different perspective. From the time she was young, nature has always been her love and inspiration.  Plants and flowers were always a part of her life. “God’s creation is what inspires me” and it is the diverse and mountainous landscapes of the West she has fallen in love with. The oceans of California, red rocks of the desert and the mountains of Montana andColorado, all provide Hesson with ideal inspiration for her Western landscapes. She hopes her art can be healing and free us, for just a moment, from the complex lives we lead, reminding people of the beauty that constantly surrounds us.

“Hot Horizons, Cool Coastlines”

Francis Livingston

Can’t get away for the summer? Come visit Bonner David during Summer Spectacular Art walk Thursday, July 7th from 6-9 pm and let our show, “Hot Horizons, Cool Coastlines” take your imagination on a truly unique vacation. 

Stroll down the Boardwalk and enjoy your favorite ice cream cone with Francis Livingston or relive days at Coney Island.   You could relax on the beach with John

John Burton

Burton’s magnificent coastal scenes or lose yourself in a Max Hammond abstract, taken from his days running along the Great Salt Lake.

Max Hammond

Imagine yourself watching the horizons provided by Nathan Fischer’s bronze work where land or water meets sky.

If the ocean is not what you seek, perhaps you’d rather travel to rural landscapes with fields blanketed with flowers in the breathtaking paintings by Romona Youngquist. Or imagine yourself in Provence villages seeking out red rooftops amid the vivid countryside in the splendid panoramas from Claudia Hartley.

Claudia Hartley

If  France is too far, visit the vibrant hills in California brilliantly painted by Gail Morris. Then, take a leisurely walk by the tranquil streams of Brad Aldridge and afterwards peer off into the distance and view Rich Bowman’s magnificent sunsets.

Each of our landscape artists brings their own technique, beautiful bright colors, and the picture perfect scenery one needs for an amazing vacation. 

Gail Morris

Come bask in the beauty of each of these remarkable pieces of art and let yourself unwind from the summer heat of everyday city life.