Bone Appetite

ernie lgOn Thursday, April 10th, the Scottsdale Gallery Association is dedicating its first ever Scottsdale Art Walk to our four-legged friends. Bonner David Galleries has long been in support of our furry family members and is excited to join in the celebration of dogs. That night, we will be featuring the distinctive work of Ron Burns, who has become famous for depicting ‘furever best friends’ of all kinds. From search and rescue dogs and shelter dogs, to portraits of loved pets, past and present, he has a keen eye for capturing the souls of our favorite animals.

During the night, we will also have donations from Bentley’s Biscuts, who create healthy and tasty treats that dogs simply love. Join us from 7:00 – 9:00 pm of April 10th, for a night dedicated to our pets who hold a special place in our hearts.

Romona Youngquist “Back to the Country”

Garden Path 40x40

Romona Youngquist’s work can be recognized by the picturesque barns and country houses, bright pops of color, and strong brushstrokes that make up her idyllic country scenes. The works from her newest show are no exception, allowing you to travel from the congestion of city life, to the serenity of the country.

Although Youngquist uses her surroundings in Oregon as a primary inspiration, each scene feels timeless and place-less, as if it could be right out a story book, or your favorite memory of home. The tension in her deliberate, impressionistic brushstrokes resolves within the serene images of rural fields and barns, resulting in a dramatic landscape full of tension, intrigue and beauty.

Her show will open on February 20, 2014 with a special artists reception from 6-9 pm. The show will then hang in the gallery through March 17th. Be sure to stop by and see these wonderful works in person, before it’s too late.

“Storytellers”

IMG_6945_edited webFor Scottsdale’s Native Artwalk, Bonner David Galleries has a spectacular show featuring two native artists, Painter Nocona Burgess and the our newest sculptor artist,  Holly Wilson. Together their works express two different ways of carrying on traditional and their works are both inspired and informed by stories of their histories, culture and beliefs.

Nocona Burgess, who is Comanche, uses accents of highly saturated colors in unexpected way to create the portraits of the real-life people from his heritage, those from the history of art and the animals he that filled the stories he heard as a child. His unique style blends the an often monochromatic figure, which vaguely resembles the black and white photo he may have used as inspiration with bold, unmistakable pops of vivid color, leaving his own mark on the pasts that inspire him.

image001Holly Wilson, Cherokee/Delaware, creates incredibly intricate, bronze and wood sculptures inspired by a mixture of observed human emotion and the legends of her background. Using the traditional lost wax method, Wilson creates each of her sculptures as one of a kind pieces, singular in edition, as she believes that each work of art has a unique spirit that can not be duplicated.

The show will open February 27, 2014 and remain on display until March 17, 2014. On Thursday, February 27, from 6-9 pm there will be a special artists reception to open the exhibit. This stunning show is one you do not want to miss, so come and join us for a night of exquisite art.

Eric Bowman “Personal Space”

Blue Benediction (24x30) panelEric Bowman’s paintings focus on the many perspectives of everyday life and human emotion. From backstage scenes of ballerina’s stretching and getting in costume, to performers lost in the height of a song, his newest show features a variety of ways to view the term, “personal space.” He has the ability to portray these intimate scenes in a delicate way that embraces the grace, intensity, passion and fleeting nature of the moment.

Nationally awarded, Eric Bowman’s work can be found in private and public collections worldwide. His latest work comprises a beautiful and eye-catching must see show, which opens on January 23, 2014 until February 3, 2014. There will be a special opening reception on Thursday, January 23, from 6-9pm. Join for an evening of art celebrating people being people.

Max Hammond “Pieces of Her Presence”

horizontal hammond

Pieces of her presence | Max Hammond

thirty seconds of respite.
just enough time to,
ease the pain in her calves.
colorful bags piled at her feet,
she eases her toes from steep shoes.
a cup of expensive coffee
in a cheap foam cup,
steams in the light from an overhead window.
alone, behind sunglasses
her little sanctuary..
she sips with her eyes the guilty pleasure of
watching people.
here they are, a parade of purposeful humanity.
possessing a direction of sorts
until, distracted by a giant photo in a window
of all things to fill their emptiness.
a vague roller coaster of chronology,
projects in need of completion.
Disembodied, they have a cadence…
the pluckish angel, the unaware, the entitled, the ones beaten up
one too many times by life.
opposite her is a divergence,
a rock in the stream
a dress with no pattern
faces in shadow
others, illuminated by so many sources
that features are indistinguishable from the background
from a window seat across the atrium
she feels a gaze
discomfited, she moves her eyes without turning her head…
a man in paint smeared clothes
is sketching.

In today’s art world, the term “abstract” is used abundantly, often with the assumption that abstract art is about nothing. However, artist Max Hammond does not view his work this way, nor does he want those who view his work to see it that way. For him, the word abstract is used too loosely, diluting the meaning of it.

For his upcoming show, Hammond hopes to visually educate viewers about his art and “abstract” art.  It’s often assumed that abstract art and non-representational art are one and the same. However, he wants people to understand that, “abstract art is about something, it is abstracted from something.” In contrast, he defines non-representational art as a “more formal painting style that has an emotional base, yet is not abstracted from an object, figure or landscape.”

Max Hammond studied figurative painting while earning his bachelors degree from the University of Utah. There he received a very traditional training, with a strong focus on drafting skills, emphasizing classical figure drawing. Later, while working towards his M.F.A from Arizona State University, a professor made a suggestion. Noticing that Hammond’s work had a strong focus on formal elements, such as color, texture and line, his professor made a comment that he should remove the figure altogether and paint pure abstract.

Hammond took this comment to heart and started experimenting with a new style. This new, sculptural way of painting was exciting and freeing. At that point he did away with his old thesis and started over, creating a completely new thesis show. It wasn’t until several years later that he reintroduced the figure into his work. Since then, he has continued to experiment with abstracting his figures.

By placing two works, side-by-side, one abstracted female figure and the other completely abstracted to the point where the “figure is almost or completely lost in the paint,” Hammond is able to help the viewer understand his process better. In doing so, he is informing people that his work is not empty, but carefully constructed with a specific idea in mind.

For Hammond, the process of creating abstract art is not a linear process. He begins by sketching a basic layout for his painting and then roughing out the first layers. After that, the rest of his process is a constant balancing act, adding layer after layer and then reassessing and adding or subtracting more layers to maintain balance.

Hammond’s art is intended to have meaning further than just the emotions it evokes. How each viewer reads his work may vary, but his goal remains the same. He may be inspired by his wife, people watching as they go to lunch, or by the figures he sees walking down the street; but whatever the original inspiration, each painting he creates is has a meaning and a subject, whether identifiable or not, it is always about something.

Max Hammond’s show opens on November 7th at 6pm with a special artist reception until 9pm. On Saturday, November 9th, from 10-2pm Max Hammond will be in the gallery for a Conversation with the artist and will be talking more in depth about his new series and the concept behind it. His show will hang in the gallery through November 29th.

Max Hammond “Still Lives in the City”

leaning 48x36Max Hammond, a skilled abstract artist, has a way with colors. He masterfully combines the pigments of the paints into beautiful works of art on each canvas. His most recent paintings, inspired by cityscapes, only add to this exquisite body of work. In addition, Hammond’s show this year also features his distinctive figurative paintings. With unique skill, he captures the essence of the human form, fusing it with the expressive strokes of abstract backgrounds.

Hammond’s show opens March 21, 2013 from 6-9pm and will hang in the gallery through April 17. To see all the images from this new show, please visit our website, or click the following link to view the PDF for his 2013 show brochure: MaxHammondStillLivesintheCity

Romona Youngquist “Through the Trees”

Currently hanging in Bonner David galleries, are the exquisite works of nationally-recognized landscape artist, Romona Youngquist. With fields of poppies, rustic barns, and hillside pastures, each scene takes you away to the serene sights of the Oregon countryside. Ranging in sizes from full wall size to small, her paintings fill a room creating a beautiful and tranquil atmosphere.

On Thursday evening, March 1, we hosted the opening of Youngquist’s show.  Here to reveal her newest paintings, Youngquist traveled, with her husband, to attend the show. Full of life and vibrancy, she was thrilled to see the fruits of her labors framed and displayed throughout the gallery. Each piece was a hit, stealing glances and hearts of everyone in attendance. Only adding to the richness of the night, were the decadent chocolates, brought all the way from Honest Portland by Youngquist herself. It was a night filled with friends, drinks, chocolate and art. What more could you ask for?

Come in and see the truly stunning works by Romona Youngquist and witness their breathtaking beauty for yourself.

“Unintended Light”

Coming to Bonner David Galleries on February 25 – March 20, 2012, is local painter Max Hammond. Embracing the pure untainted beauty of abstract painting, Hammond creates work that catches the eye and stirs you at the core. Focusing on color, form and texture, he is able to create unique paintings that evoke emotion and intrigue.

Hammond received his B.F.A from the University of Utah; painting landscapes of the salt marshes he grew up around, as well as studying the classical human form. However, his love for color began when he won a six-week trip to Mexico. There he saw color used in a way he had never seen before. The people utilized color to bring life to otherwise dull and unsightly living quarters. Later, Hammond received his M.F.A in painting from Arizona State University.

Hammond’s upcoming show, “Unintended Light,” will feature his newest paintings, which seem to emit a light and a life of their own. Hammond says of his art, “Abstract painting is the poetry of painting; it exists to converse with you in solitary moments as in the solitude it was created. It doesn’t tell you what it means, it suggests, teases and eludes, perhaps even whispers to you when you can’t sleep at night. And even as the words in a sentence may change their intonations with time so may the color passages shift in your eyes.” Come join us at the reception, Saturday, February 25, 2012, from 1:00-5:00pm and enjoy these amazing works of art for yourself.

"Nature's Magic" by Jane Jones

"Breat of Spring" by Jane Jones

As the summer months heat up changing the landscape of our diverse desert, celebrate the magic of a summer garden with Bonner David Galleries and Colorado artist Jane Jones!

Jane’s exquisitely painted flowers beautifully showcase the variety of life that only nature can offer. Complimenting each composition with vivid light and vibrant color, Jane brings out the gorgeous yet understated qualities of her subjects. In anticipation of her upcoming show “Nature’s Magic,” we had fun talking with Jane about her new collection. Here is what she said:

Bonner David Galleries: As a floral artist you must have an endless stream of inspiration; with such variety how do you choose your subjects? Is there a special process to it? 

Jane Jones: I want to portray the power, fragility, beauty and variety that nature has to offer, so I pick flowers that I think will do that.  Of course I also have to love them.  I am always looking for new flowers, in gardening catalogs, at the florist, at the nursery, in other people’s gardens…wherever I can find them.  Then if it is something that will grow in my gardens, I give it a try.  I love to see how they grow, and the various stages of life and blossoming, and how they look in sunlight.  

Then I spend some time with them to find out what it is that they can and seem to want to communicate….power, delicacy, movement, and what their best qualities are….color, an arc of a stem, the dance of their petals, majesty, humor, durability, and compose with them to show those qualities off.

BDG: Do you have a favorite flower or varietal? 

Jane: My favorite flower is the one I am working on, or is blooming in my garden.  Today my irises are beginning their annual show, and they are magnificent!!!!  And I am painting roses today that I grew last summer, and I love them a lot right now.  As I spend the time to paint a flower I see amazing things in it that I would not see any other way.  And I see it as part of my job to help other people to see the magnificent beauty that is all around us…if we take the time to see it.

BDG: Living in a climate that is very cold in the winter, how do you stay inspired throughout the year? 

Jane: During the gardening year, I set up still lifes with my flowers.  I take hundreds of photos each year and they keep me inspired in the winter.  But if I need a “flower fix” I go to the conservatory at the Denver Botanic Gardens, or flower shops just to see living plants.   

And if I am really lucky, one of my indoor plants, orchids or amaryllis, is blooming!

 I also keep notebooks with ideas and pictures and writings and all I have to do is spend a few hours, or minutes, going through those and I am fired up again.   I have enough ideas to keep me busy for several lifetimes!

BDG: Do you have a motto that you live by?

 

Jane: My favorite motto is “No try, No get.”  What that means to me is that if I don’t try for something, then it surely won’t ever happen.  It means that to reach my goals I have to put me and my work and ideas out into the world every day.  If I think up some goal, and think I can’t make it happen, then I can’t…but if I stay positive, and try like crazy, then if it is something that I am supposed to be doing, it will happen.   

I am pretty well grounded in my spirituality and believe that I have gifts and opportunities, and it is my responsibility to realize those and give back to the world.

BDG: You have authored many books and DVDs teaching others your techniques? What motivates you to teach and write? 

Jane: I did not ever set out in this life to be a teacher, but I have been teaching something since I was 19 years old.  Teaching opportunities have come my way.  I think I have only ever applied for one teaching job.  It seems to be one of the things that I am put here to do.  

I remember how much I wanted to learn to be an artist.  It was an unquenchable desire and passion.  When I was a total beginning painter, I was very lucky to have one of the most generous, nurturing and supportive teachers EVER!  I know that I was very, very lucky! 

Then as I went on to art school I really had to fight for what I wanted to learn and sometimes it was really frustrating.  DVDs and videos were not available, but I learned a lot from books on my own, and by just spending hours working in my studio. 

I know what it is like to want to learn, and need good instruction.  I know what it is like to have that passion and desire to create, and need help getting there.  My goal as a teacher is to help people on THEIR journey as artists.   Learning to paint is very hard work, and I love hearing that I have made it easier for someone, or that I have helped them to rekindle a passion, or find their way toward realizing their artistic dreams.   The feedback that I get from people is amazing and I am so pleased to be a part of their journey. 

BDG: Who is your hero? Is there one person who inspires you? 

Jane: I taught Art History for many years, so I have a lot of artistic heroes.  Michelangelo is my favorite.  I love the clarity of the communication in his work, and his unwavering commitment to his vision and his art during times of incredible hardship and frustration. 

There are two 17th century Dutch women who were incredible floral painters; Maria van Oosterwyck and Rachel Ruysch.  (I included them both in my book, Classic Still Life Painting.  The beauty of their flowers is breathtaking.  And they made those paintings without the opportunities, conveniences and comfort that I take for granted.  Again, they had visions for their work and realized them, no matter what!

“Star Rise” by Jane Jones

Jane Jones will reveal her latest collection “Nature’s Magic” on Thursday June 3, 2010 at from 6:00-8:00 p.m. The show will hang through June 16, 2010. You definitely must see her work in person to truly grasp the magnificence of her technique and we cannot wait to share this experience with you!

To read her full Bio and view a full collection of her work please click here http://www.bonnerdavid.com/Artview1.asp?At=JaneJones

Don’t miss Jane Jones in the June issue of American Art Collector Magazine!

For more information about Jane Jones and her work please contact us art@bonnerdavid.com or call us at 480.941.8500


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"Through the Season's" by Romona Youngquist

Bonner David Galleries is excited to showcase new works by renown landscape artist Romona Youngquist. From the time Youngquist was a child, she knew she was meant to be an artist. Romona spent her days exploring the woods and gazing up in awe at the storms that often filled the Eastern Oklahoma sky. She developed an early appreciation for the beauty and contrasts in nature, and though self-taught, she feels it’s only fair to cite nature as her real teacher. 

 Romona describes her paintings as a formula between color and value relationships. She believes that her understanding of these relationships comes from a life of studying nature and the environment. Youngquist’s paintings are inspired by understated landscapes, as she enjoys painting scenery that she finds elegant but commonplace at the same time. For Youngquist, finding interesting things to paint is a long process, as they have to be just right to catch her eye. Her use of vivid colors against soft neutral backdrops emphasizes the breathtaking effects that nature offers, which are often overlooked.

"High Water" by Romona Youngquist

 “I can come upon an ordinary scene I’ve seen a zillion times and there is a special light that hits this scene….and I stop in my tracks” ~Romona Youngquist   

Youngquist’s latest work reflects what is most near and dear to her, with more rural scenery inspired by the picturesque countryside near her home. These paintings add drama and tension to her famous peaceful scenes. Youngquist’s latest works are reminiscent of her paintings from previous collections, but with greater emphasis on sunlight and shadows during the changing seasons.   

In anticipation of her upcoming show we talked with Romona about her career, her life, and what inspires her most. Here is what she shared with us:   

Bonner David: What is your reason for only painting landscapes in a 25 mile radius from your home?   

Youngquist: I believe in painting mostly what you know. For me, that is the landscape that I see everyday. I need to have an emotional attachment to what I paint, and I love the place where I live. I am very lucky to live in one of the most beautiful places in the world. It’s scenic in a quiet, rural way. Some areas are like stepping back in time, but then you see all the beautiful vineyards. We really have it all here in Oregon. One of my favorite painters, Russell Chatham, does the same thing, and I think it’s really helped him create his own genre of landscape painting.   

Bonner David: Was there a particular moment as a child when you knew that you were destined to be a painter?   

Youngquist: At age 4, when my preschool teacher, bless her heart, loved a chicken I drew and showed it to the entire class. At that moment she said I was “an artist.” But more importantly was the feeling of pure joy while creating art that all started with that chicken.   

Bonner David: What is your favorite thing to do on a rainy day?   

Youngquist: Have a cup of coffee and curl up with a good book surrounded by all my animals.   

Bonner David: Do you have any other creative talents?   

Youngquist: I have a beautiful garden that I love to tend, I bake like crazy, and I read way too much. But I really love to sing. My friend Sandy and I often go to a karaoke spot. My favorite songs to sing are Cowboy Junkies’ “Sweet Jane”, Mazzy Star’s “Fade into You,” and Portishead’s “Sour Times”–obscure songs nobody knows. But the real show stealer is when my husband has had a little too much to drink and does Kung Fu Fighting- with all the moves!   

Bonner David: If you were not a painter, what would you be?    

Youngquist: A Food Network Star…seriously…I auditioned in Portland last year. I fear the reason I didn’t make it was the answer to “What is your favorite food memory?” My answer was, “fried squirrel dinner when I was a kid.”   

"Country Sunflowers" by Romona Youngquist

Youngquist is featured in this month’s issue of American Art Collector (Read the full article- RomonaYoungquist-American Art Coll. Feb 2010).

Romona’s breathtaking work will be on display at her upcoming show “Through the Seasons” at Bonner David Galleries (Map and Hours) February 25, 2010 through March 10, 2010. There will be a special artist reception on February 25, 2010 from 6:00 to 9:00pm. We hope you have a chance to come discover her stunning paintings and meet her in person.

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